Compared to other age groups, the elderly (65 years or older) tend to be more exposed to health risks of specific weather events, such as heat stress caused by high temperatures, cold-related ailments due to low temperatures or injuries due to slippery conditions in icy pavement conditions. Photo: Knud Nielsen/Colorbox
Compared to other age groups, the elderly (65 years or older) tend to be more exposed to health risks of specific weather events, such as heat stress caused by high temperatures, cold-related ailments due to low temperatures or injuries due to slippery conditions in icy pavement conditions. © Photo: Knud Nielsen/Colorbox

New mapping tool shows where the elderly may be vulnerable to climate change

Press realese 2016-12-01 The Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI)
The population of Finland is projected to age significantly in future decades. Over the same period, the Finnish climate is expected to become warmer, leading to changes in the number and severity of extreme weather events that could have important impacts on the health of elderly people. Read more

Latest news of the Ministry of the Environment

Minister Tiilikainen to visit Mexico on a trade mission on 28 November–1 December

2016-11-28
Minister of Agriculture and the Environment Kimmo Tiilikainen, accompanied by a business delegation, will visit Mexico on 28 November–1 December 2016. This is one of Team Finland export promotion visits.
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Latest news of the Finnish Environment Institute

Flooding river

Weather and climate risks should be managed efficiently

2016-12-02
Maintaining security and the central functions vital to society requires active preparation for extreme weather conditions. Preparation should take into account that climate change may change extreme weather conditions, their frequency and severity. ELASTINEN research project produced an overall assessment of the management of weather and climate risks and evaluated ways to promote management of these risks in various sectors.
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Publications

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Forest carbon sinks must be included in bioeconomy sustainability assessments

Forest carbon sinks reduce the atmosphere’s carbon dioxide content. The utilisation of wood and forests inevitably affects carbon sinks, which is an issue that must be considered when seeking cost-effective means for mitigating climate change. Increasing carbon sinks is important for achieving the goals of the Paris climate agreement. Read more