Local master plans coordinate and direct local detailed plans

Local master plans are the general land use plans of municipalities. The plans give general directions on land use, for example the location of residential areas, places of employment and traffic routes. They outline general development in municipalities and direct the preparation of local detailed plans.

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© Janne Ulvinen

Local master plans can cover entire municipalities or parts of them, in which case they are called partial master plans. Municipalities may also draft a local master plan jointly. The plan is displayed on a map, appended with notations, regulations and a description.

Local master plans are flexible. They can be very strategic and give instructions on a general level, similarly to regional land use plans. On the other hand, they can also be very precise in their steering of construction. The local master plans of shorelines and villages are typically of the latter kind. The role of local master plans has also become more pronounced in directing wind power building.

Local master plans are drafted by municipalities. Plans are approved by city councils or municipal councils. If several municipalities have drafted the plan jointly, it must be approved by a joint municipal organ.

Requirements of a local master plan

In accordance with Section 39 of the Land Use and Building Act, the following must be taken into account when a local master plan is drafted:

  • the functionality, economy and ecological sustainability of the community structure
  • utilisation of the existing community structure
  • housing needs and availability of services
  • opportunities to organise traffic, especially public transport and non-motorised traffic, energy, water supply and drainage, and energy and waste management in an appropriate manner which is sustainable in terms of the environment, natural resources and economy
  • opportunities for a safe and healthy living environment which takes different population groups into equal consideration
  • business conditions within the municipality
  • reduction of environmental hazards
  • protection of the built environment, landscape and natural values
  • sufficient number of areas suitable for recreation.

More information

Environment Counsellor Matti Laitio, Minstry of the Environment, tel. + 358 295 250 154, firstname.lastname@ym.fi

Published 2013-10-28 at 12:38, updated 2018-03-15 at 14:53